The Moment Obama Lost?

From Powerline, quoting Obama:

The private sector is doing fine. Where we’re seeing weaknesses in our economy have to do with state and local government. Oftentimes cuts initiated by, you know, Governors or mayors who are not getting the kind of help that they have in the past from the federal government and who don’t have the same kind of flexibility as the federal government in dealing with fewer revenues coming in.

And so, you know, if Republicans want to be helpful, if they really want to move forward and put people back to work, what they should be thinking about is how do we help state and local governments…

Three days ago the voters of Wisconsin rejected the notion that the people should pony up ever more so that government be flush with cash…and now Obama is asserting that if the GOP wants to be helpful, the way to do it is to get the people to pony up ever more so government can b flush with cash!  This goes beyond stupid – this is an egregious rejection of basic reality.  Whatever else the people might want, more government isn’t it.

If we can’t beat Obama, now, then we might as well close up shop for good.  He’s just proven himself to be completely out  of touch and in opposition to the direction Americans want to go.

30 thoughts on “The Moment Obama Lost?

  1. Raging Bull June 8, 2012 / 7:13 pm

    wisconsin was the tipping point. in the weeks and months to follow i’m sure we’ll see more mayors and governors doing the same thing scott walker did. the TEA party for all of the grief and childish names that has been thrown at them, has started the 2nd american revolution.

    and make no mistake, it’s not a R or D they have begun to fight, it was the government that lost it’s way with zerobama being the catalyst that made everyone open their eyes. ( of course the left will just say it’s because he is black…blah, blah, blah)

    the american people have started to see the light. no longer should we fund the looters and takers. no longer should we stop being a merit based society, regardless of what the OWS wackos want. no longer should we continue down the path of europe even though they are giving us a terrific blueprint of what not to do

    GTFO 2012

  2. Cluster June 8, 2012 / 8:13 pm

    Three days ago the voters of Wisconsin rejected the notion that the people should pony up ever more so that government be flush with cash…and now Obama is asserting that if the GOP wants to be helpful, the way to do it is to get the people to pony up ever more so government can b flush with cash!

    That’s because he doesn’t know what else to do. He’s never held a real private sector job, nor ran any private sector business. The government put him through school, taught him what he knows, and now pays his salary. That’s his world, and unfortunately he is subjecting us to it as well.

    GTFO 2012

    • tiredoflibbs June 9, 2012 / 6:28 am

      When he was in the private, ever so briefly, he referred this time as to “being behind enemy lines”.

      You are correct. ObAMATEUR this America is great because of government and it’s accomplishments through massive spending and not through freedom and liberty.

  3. Retired Spook June 8, 2012 / 11:47 pm

    This was not only the moment Obama lost; this was the week that a lot of Liberals REALIZED he is going to lose.

  4. J. R. Babcock June 9, 2012 / 9:00 am

    My bet is that this election is going to be similar to 1980 when Carter still held on to a 3 or 4 point lead in the middle of October. The undecideds and independents broke for Reagan at the last minute when many of them decided they really didn’t want 4 more years of the crap sandwich that Carter had fed them.

    • Robin Naismith Green June 9, 2012 / 10:16 am

      “If you analyze it I believe the very heart and soul of conservatism is libertarianism. I think conservatism is really a misnomer just as liberalism is a misnomer for the liberals — if we were back in the days of the Revolution, so-called conservatives today would be the Liberals and the liberals would be the Tories. The basis of conservatism is a desire for less government interference or less centralized authority or more individual freedom and this is a pretty general description also of what libertarianism is.”

      • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 10:33 am

        Robin,

        I seldom agree with you, but in this case I think you’re essentially correct. Modern Conservatism has its roots in Classic Liberalism, and most Conservatives I know subscribe to at least some Libertarian principles. I do. Among those who describe themselves as Libertarians, however, you do have both Liberals and Conservatives. The new Left, OTOH, many of whom describe themselves as Progressives, derive much, if not all of their ideology from collectivist thought.

      • Cluster June 9, 2012 / 10:57 am

        Robin – you did well, good post, and you are correct. But I will also say that many conservatives not only want a smaller and leaner government, but we truly want a more effective government, and that was spelled out in the Constitution. In place of a large centralized federal bureaucracy, we need to get back to having 50 laboratories of democracy with more power given to the individual states. This will not only create a leaner, more effective government, but will also help ensure great individual freedoms.

      • Robin Naismith Green June 9, 2012 / 11:07 am

        Retired Spook you must have taken your B-6 this morning because you are sharp young man. The problem of the US government is that it is too large for sure. But America is a huge country. Giving more responsibility to the States is exactly what should happen but if they are not to delve to deep into the freedoms people have then civil rights are up to the citizens of each state, correct? Mobility is a powerful thing in America and the nation is as diverse as any in the world. If you don’t like the laws in New Hampshire you can move to Arkansas and vice versa with relative ease. That is if you can find work and shelter. To have those things the corporations have to get up off their asses and invest in job creation instead of sitting on their lucre to appease large shareholders.

      • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 11:19 am

        To have those things the corporations have to get up off their asses and invest in job creation instead of sitting on their lucre to appease large shareholders.

        Robin,

        You are under the same misconception about the purpose of a business that Obama is: that business exists to provide jobs. Business’ primary responsibility is to its owners and shareholders. Jobs are a result of a successful business, not it’s reason for being. I had to laugh during Obama’s speech the other day, when he talked about tax incentives for businesses to hire people. No amount of tax incentive will convince a business based on a sound business model to hire employees that are not needed.

      • Robin Naismith Green June 9, 2012 / 11:22 am

        So you would agree that the 8 million jobs lost were not due to any errors in the executive branch but due largely to corporations protecting themselves from collapse by shedding workers?

      • Cluster June 9, 2012 / 11:23 am

        To have those things the corporations have to get up off their asses and invest in job creation

        That is true, but corporations don’t operate in a vacuum. The reason why they are sitting on that stock pile is because the tax and regulatory environment is too uncertain at the moment, and until that changes, employment will remain stagnate.

      • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 11:29 am

        So you would agree that the 8 million jobs lost were not due to any errors in the executive branch but due largely to corporations protecting themselves from collapse by shedding workers?

        Well, that’s certainly part of it, but it’s really not that simple. Companies did, indeed, shed workers to protect their bottom line, but the shrinking bottom line was, in at least part, the result of government policies that caused economic growth to screech to a halt, particularly in the housing and construction sectors.

      • Robin Naismith Green June 9, 2012 / 11:39 am

        Well I can’t disagree with that. The housing crisis was simply caused by the greed of banks and mortgage lenders who with the power of credit default swaps couldn’t lose as long as the music kept playing.

      • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 11:58 am

        The housing crisis was simply caused by the greed of banks and mortgage lenders who with the power of credit default swaps couldn’t lose as long as the music kept playing.

        Again – true, but a gross over-simplification.

      • Cluster June 9, 2012 / 12:04 pm

        Robin,

        The housing crisis was driven by the government, and their use of cheap fed money to incentivize the banks to relax their standards and issue mortgages to those who typically couldn’t qualify. On their own, banks wouldn’t be making high risk loans such as those. It’s just not good business.

      • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 2:56 pm

        Retired Spook you must have taken your B-6 this morning because you are sharp young man.

        Yeah, a “young” 67, LOL!

  5. Amazona June 9, 2012 / 10:05 am

    I had a mid-day appointment in Denver yesterday so I blocked the whole day out to do some shopping. I went out to a great mall between Denver and Boulder, Flatirons Crossing, and found that every store I intended to visit was gone. One whole section of this large and impressive shopping mall is a ghost town, with only one store left. Now this is not a strip mall. This is a beautiful upscale shopping area, or was.

    So I headed out to south Denver, only to find three of the stores I wanted to visit closed. Well, one is as good as closed, with little merchandise left and the fixtures stacked near the front.

    I went down East Hampden to a nice upscale smaller mall, Tamarac Square, and found it not only closed but razed to the ground, and surrounded by chain link fence. No one knows when anything will be rebuilt there. I was there early in 2011, and it was still a busy place, with small boutique and specialty stores, a couple of chain restaurants and a deli and two really good local restaurants. However, the owners had declared it to be a “non-income-producing” property and decided to raze it and put up a Target store. Now Target is ready to pull out without about $5 million in tax breaks from Denver, so this is just a big hole.

    I drove over to a little neighborhood restaurant I like to visit when I am in town. The furniture store on one side and the framing shop on the other are out of business, and the restaurant is hurting.

    Denver was like a war zone, and Colorado has been hit a lot less than a lot of other places. I know it’s been a while since I shopped much in Denver, but not long enough for natural attrition to get rid of my old haunts–that’s a lot of loss in about a year and a half.

    The only thing that makes me feel better about this is learning that the private sector is doing fine.

    • Robin Naismith Green June 9, 2012 / 10:46 am

      Two things from rickackerman.com. First a quote about the Flatirons Crossing descent into abandonment:

      “The huge new hole in the retail landscape comes at a bad time for nearby Flatiron Crossing Mall, a 1.5 million-square-foot, $220 million shopping center that itself is reeling from the recent closures of Borders Books and Ultimate Electronics. Other stores that have closed there in recent years include Abercrombie & Fitch, which mistakenly thought its snob-appeal pricing would survive the Great Recession; Fossil, McDonald’s, Godiva Chocolates, Sharper Image and numerous smaller retailers. The exodus actually began about eight years ago when one of Flatiron Crossing’s anchor tenants, Lord & Taylor, became a casualty of a 32-store closing by the parent company. The two-story building that had housed Lord & Taylor, an upscale department store, sat empty for six years, a gangrenous appendage of a mall that has been in survival mode ever since.”

      And then this from a commenter on the same site John Jay:

      As more and more Americans are forced into a VSL (Very Simple Lifestyle) competition in retail and restaurant will intensify. The Government tells us food and energy inflation don’t matter. But that inflation does matter to the increasing number of Americans living paycheck to paycheck. It means less diposable income to eat out and pay $50 for $5 worth of food in a restaurant. It means less money for thoughtless shopping sprees to the mall.
      Then as all that trickles down, it means less rent money to the CRE sector, and less sales tax to local governments. Mava is right about mal-investment.
      Here in LA the big news is the plan to build a mega stadium complex downtown to lure an NFL franchise back here. It should generate lots of hot dog vendor jobs for one day every other week for three months a year. Think of a football stadium as a huge shopping mall/restaurant where people who like to everpay for everything feel right at home twelve days a year. (including pre-season etc.) I think we shall see more and more evidence of the VSL taking hold in America in the future. And there will be fallout from that new trend.

      • Amazona June 9, 2012 / 8:37 pm

        Robin thank you for another way of pointing out that these businesses have failed because of the declining economy.

        BTW, while it is fine to believe that VSL is a good thing, it is not fine to shove it down peoples’ throats by forcing it upon them via undermining the economy.

        You Lefties are really theocrats at heart, but your state religion is the religion of the State, and you believe it right and moral and good to impose your own standards and beliefs on others, even if they don’t want to live the way you think they should live.

  6. Robin Naismith Green June 9, 2012 / 10:52 am

    Being a conservative is like being one of Bradbury’s Firemen from Fahrenheit 451. Every time you see a story, no matter how trivial, that casts a shadow upon the President you run with it. First it was Mark and the bank failures. Suddenly, as they slowed we nothing from B4V about bank failures. Then it was gasoline prices; now that they are trending to below $3.40 per gallon nationally there are no more high gas price stories. Not too long ago it was how the Dow Jones Industrial Average was going to tank and then it roared to over 13,000 and is currently at 12554 so there’s no more room in the end for Dow stories. Nobody cares it seems about Fast and Furious or Solyndra or even Tesla Motors. Americans want jobs ands they want corporations to get off that 2 trillion dollar feather pillow they have been sitting on. Partisanship means nothing to a man who wants to work or to families who are getting $100 a month in Food Stamps. Enough blame how about some action and cooperation between the parties?

    • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 11:09 am

      Enough blame how about some action and cooperation between the parties?

      Robin, the Tea Party is forcing the GOP to trend to the right at the same time that the Democrat Party has lurched violently to the left. I’m not sure how you get cooperation between such polar opposites. For example, which of the principles that guide your thinking would you be willing to compromise on? Which of our principles do you think we should compromise on. What is the ultimate goal if we both give up a little? Specifically, can you picture a country where we all get along, and how would you accomplish that when we clearly don’t want the same things. Would the ultimate compromise be to make each of us equally miserable?

      • GMB June 9, 2012 / 3:14 pm

        Time for compromise is almost up. Blue dog democrats are dead. Rinos are a dying breed and are being picked off one by one. Sooner rather than later the repub leadership in Congress will be replaced by members far more conservative than what is there now.

        They will not play well with pelosi, reid, and hoyer.. In fact they may not play with them at all. I look forward to the moment when the left is frozen out of the process just like the repubs were 2009-2011.

        November 2010 and June 2012 were no minor shift in the direction the people want this country to go. They were hard turns to the right.

        The people that voting for this hard turn do not want compromise. We want the progressive/communist/socialist, movement halted in it’s tracks. For now.

        If the repubs are smart they will start rolling it back bit by bit, piece by piece. $50 million here, $5million there, a $1billion somewhere where else and soon real money will be saved.

        If they are smart.

      • Cluster June 9, 2012 / 8:16 pm

        If the repubs are smart they will start rolling it back bit by bit, piece by piece. $50 million here, $5million there, a $1billion somewhere where else and soon real money will be saved.

        Couldn’t agree more GMB, and it will take more than one term to finish the job so conservatives need to think in terms of multiple elections similar to the last two in 2010 and with Walker in WI. Romney will have a lot to do including repealing Obamacare, regulatory, entitlement and tax reforms, and developing a serious plan to become energy independent, among many others, and that will take all of one term if not two, but in order to keep winning they have to produce results, and that’s best done incrementally.

    • Cluster June 9, 2012 / 11:10 am

      Robin, you did so well in an earlier post, but this one has you off the rails again, in fact I am not even sure what your point is. The price of gas is still obscenely high considering the barrel of oil is under $90. The last time the barrel was priced this low, gas was about $2.50/gallon. Re: bank failures, there still may be a few more to come, but attrition in that industry is nearly complete, hence the lack of news, and a lot of people care about corruption in government, ie; solyndra and fast and furious – you only wish that people didn’t care, but those two issues will help defeat Obama in November, that you can be assure of.

      Walker’s victory in WI proved to conservatives that the voting public is not on board with the current democratic agenda, therefore cooperation with an unpopular agenda is not the way to win. The democratic party has gone so far left, that they risk alienating a lot of Americans and may have to purge themselves of the Obama’s, Pelosi’s, Reid’s, etc, before ever obtaining power again. The Obama agenda was resoundly defeated in November 2010, and again just last week in WI, which is a very blue state. This trend will continue this November, and it will be incumbent upon rational democrats to shed themselves of the far left, if they ever hope to get back into the game. As it is now, the only base of constituents the democrats have are the shrinking public unions and women who want to kill their babies.

    • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 6:29 pm

      First it was Mark and the bank failures. Suddenly, as they slowed we nothing from B4V about bank failures.

      Funny you should mention bank failures, Robin, only a day after the 27th and 28th bank failures of 2012 were announced. Bank failures at the rate of over 50 a year may not be news anymore, but it certainly can’t be good.

    • Amazona June 9, 2012 / 8:34 pm

      Robin, you skirt reason and then when you get too close to it you skitter away.

      First, you need to get over the Leftist meme that every criticism of what is going on is a personal criticism of the man who is Barack Obama. This is about ideology, which dictates policy, and when we see policies with bad outcomes we understand that they come from the ideology of Barack Obama. Get over the fretting and fussing that anyone gives a hoot about Barack Obama. Catch him in a tractor beam, beam him up to his Mother Ship and replace him with someone else, and we will have exactly the same reaction to failed policies which we believe are harming the nation.

      “Nobody cares it seems about Fast and Furious or Solyndra or even Tesla Motors. ”

      Really? You really ought to work a little harder on basic keeping-up.

      “…2 trillion dollar feather pillow …” ? This is a truly nonsensical statement, on so many levels. First, as Spook pointed out, the business of business is not to create jobs. The business of business is business, and successful businesses happen to create jobs as a result of their success and to increase this success. Anyone with even the most basic understanding of business knows that business expenses have to be deducted from profits, and also knows that our corporate income tax rate is one of the highest in the world. Do try to find out what you are talking about before you opine on things like this. You only embarrass yourself when you say such utterly stupid things which do nothing but spotlight your ignorance.

      There are no food stamps any more, there are credit cards which can be used to buy food. And anyone who gets only $100 a month in assistance doesn’t really need it. Old talking point, Robin. Old, tired, debunked, silly talking point. See comment above on finding out what you are talking about before you opine.

      “….how about some action and cooperation between the parties?”

      Good question. But you need to ask the right questions first. For example, the first step toward working together is agreeing on a goal. Cooperation happens when both sides agree on a goal and then only have to find ways to achieve that goal, which usually involves some give-and-take. What we are seeing, and have seen for quite some time, is goals being thrown under the bus in favor of gross and blatant demagoguery.

      Example: Let’s say the Left says its goal is to feed poor children. The Right agrees, this is a worthy goal. Therefore, the next step ought to be rational discussion about how best to do this. But what happens is, the Left says there is one way to do this and only one way, their way, which happens to totally contradict the Right’s objective political philosophy, so letting the Left have its way would not be compromise, it would be capitulation.

      So poor children do not get fed. BUT….the true goal of the Left is met, which was never the feeding of poor children but the demonizing of the Right, because once the Right has walked away from an entirely dogmatic and unacceptable position the Left can then trumpet its claim that the Right doesn’t care if children go hungry. And this was the intent from the get-go.

      So if you truly want cooperation and true compromise, drop the either/or paradigm, and agree that the goals are shared and the only thing left is to figure out how to meet them.

      • Retired Spook June 9, 2012 / 11:03 pm

        So if you truly want cooperation and true compromise, drop the either/or paradigm, and agree that the goals are shared and the only thing left is to figure out how to meet them.

        Sounds like the makings of a new thread.

      • neocon1 June 10, 2012 / 4:50 pm

        rubin nitwit

        Corporations = Eeeeeeeeevil

        communism & OPM = Gooooood

    • Mark Edward Noonan June 10, 2012 / 11:16 pm

      Robin,

      Actually, I went on hiatus for 6 months and then decided that in the post-hiatus world I wouldn’t be posting 2 to 4 articles a day…If I were I’d still have plenty to say about such moment-to-moment issues. You’ll also notice that I haven’t done a “What Media Bias?” piece for a while. Its just a matter of a different sort of blogging.

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